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Ultimate Care Horse Feed

We offer three types of Ultimate Care Horse Feed, as well as a supplement, and a mineral.


The NEMO “Ultimate Care Horse Advantage”

Our Commitment to You

Provide products and programs that promote more profitability to you operation.

Balanced Nutrition

Only highly digestible ingredients are used and are properly balanced to match the specific needs of your horses.

Consistent Formulation

For optimum health and productivity, our team of experienced nutritionists provides us with properly formulated feed for your horses per their nutritional needs.

Brochure

Ultimate Care Horse Feed Products

Powered by Equi-lete® Technology

Features & Benefits

  • Highly bioavailable trace minerals (zinc, copper, and manganese)
  • Selenium yeast, a highly bioavailable source of organic selenium
  • Includes a blend of essential vitamins
  • Vitamin B complex to facilitate metabolic function
  • Highly bioavailable form of ocean derived calcium and magnesium
  • Prebiotics, probiotics, and enzymes to maintain a healthy gastro-intestinal tract
  • Includes Yucca schidigera

Rope ‘N’ Ride 1200

Feeding Directions

Rope ‘N’ Ride 1200 is designed to be fed with good quality grass and/or legume hay (free choice) and plenty of fresh water. Offer ¼ to 1 pound of Rope’N’Ride 1200 per 100 lbs of body weight daily depending on body condition and type of activity. Divide daily ration into at least two feedings per day.

Features & Benefits

  • Highly bioavailable trace minerals
    • Promotes immune and metabolic function
    • Improves hoof health
  • Digestible fat from soy oil
    • Added nourishment to support performance and endurance
    • Keeps hair and coat shiny and healthy
  • Versatile
    • Feed one diet to all your horses without negotiating nutrient levels
  • Consistent feed source
    • Guaranteed formula used to ensure consistency
    • Crimped oats for improved digestibility
  • Includes all the features & benefits of Equi-lete® Technology

Contender 1400

Feeding Directions

Contender 1400 is designed to be fed with good quality grass and/or legume hay (free choice) and plenty of fresh water. Offer ¼ to 1 pound of Contender 1400 per 100 lbs of body weight daily depending on body condition and type of activity. Divide daily ration into at least two feedings per day.

Features & Benefits

  • Essential amino acids
    • High quality protein sources
    • Sustains muscle maintenance and health
    • Promotes organ growth and repair
  • Comprehensive vitamin and mineral pack
    • Highly bioavailable trace minerals including organic selenium
    • Supports the immune system
    • Vitamin B complex to facilitate metabolic function.
    • Improves hoof health
  • Nutrition to support immune and GI tract health
    • Prebiotics, probiotics, enzymes, live yeast and yeast culture
  • Includes Yucca schidigera
  • Includes all the features & benefits of Equi-lete® Technology

Mare ‘N’ Foal 1600

Feeding Directions

Mare ‘N’ Foal 1600 is designed to be fed with good quality grass and/or legume hay (free choice) and plenty of fresh water. Offer ¼ to 1 pound of Mare ‘N’ Foal 1600 per 100 lbs of body weight daily depending on body condition and type of activity. Divide daily ration into at least two feedings per day.

Features & Benefits

  • Essential amino acids
    • Sustains fetal development and milk production in mares
    • Helps with muscle and organ growth and repair
  • Consistent feed source
    • Guaranteed formulas used to ensure consistency
  • Added soy oil and flaxseed for energy
    • Keeps hair coat shiny and healthy
    • Provides energy for lactating mares and foals
    • Source of omega-3 Fatty Acids
  • Highly bioavailable source of ocean derived calcium and magnesium
    • Supports growth of bone and cartilage
    • Provides slow-release buffering for the GI tract
    • Promotes gastric comfort
  • Includes probiotics
    • Improves forage digestibility
    • Promotes healthy gut microbials
  • Includes all the features & benefits of Equi-lete® Technology

Balancer Pellet 2500

Feeding Directions

Use as required to supply adequate levels of nutrients to the finished feed or a forage diet. Feed at the rate of ½ to 2 ½ lbs per head per day depending on size, age, body condition, and activity level. Always provide good quality long stem roughage. Provide an abundant, fresh supply of water. Consult your nutritionist for additional feeding recommendations.

Features & Benefits

  • High-quality 25% protein pellet with essential amino acids 
    • Encourages tissue maintenance, repair, and growth.
  • A concentrated vitamin and mineral package 
    • Highly bioavailable trace minerals including organic selenium
    • Supports physiological function.
    • Vitamin B complex to facilitate metabolic function
  • Includes all the features & benefits of Equi-lete® Technology

Ultimate Care Horse Mineral

Feeding Directions

Supply Ultimate Care Horse Mineral to all classes of horses in a free choice mineral feeder as a component of a diet including pasture and/or hay and clean, fresh water. This product is to be consumed at 2-4 ounces per head per day. Ultimate Care Horse Mineral can be top dressed at the same feeding rate. For example, mix 2-4 ounces of mineral with a 5-10 lb unfortified grain mix. This mix can be split into 2 daily feedings per head per day.

Features & Benefits

  • Includes all the features and benefits of Equi-lete® Technology, in a free choice mineral
  • Provides the flexibility to address the vitamin and mineral needs of an individual horse or a herd, especially when hand feeding is challenging

Ultimate Care Performance Horse Pellet 1200

Feeding Directions

Performance Horse Pellet 1200 is designed to be fed with good quality grass and/or legume hay (free choice) and plenty of fresh water. Offer ¼ to 1 pounds of Performance Horse Pellet 1200 per 100 lbs, of body weight daily depending on body condition and type of activity. Divide daily ration into at least two feedings per day.

Features & Benefits

  • Complete pelleted feed
  • Highly bioavailable trace minerals 
    • Promotes immune and metabolic function
    • Improves hoof health
  • Higher Fiber, lower starch than textured feed to support immune and GI tract health 
    • Promote a healthy digestive tract
    • Fiber provides a slower release of energy
  • Consistent feed source
    • Guaranteed formula used to ensure consistency
  • Versatile
    • Feed one diet to all your horses without negotiating nutrient levels
  • Includes all the features & benefits of Equi-lete® Technology

Ultimate Care Performance Horse Pellet 1500

Feeding Directions

Performance Horse Pellet 1500 is designed to be fed with good quality grass and/or legume hay (free choice) and plenty of fresh water. Offer ¼ to 1 pounds of Performance Horse Pellet 1500 per 100 lbs of body weight daily depending on body condition and type of activity. Divide daily ration into at least two feedings per day.

Features & Benefits

  • Complete pelleted feed
    • Essential amino acids
    • High quality protein sources
    • Sustains muscle maintenance and health
    • Promotes organ growth and repair
  • Comprehensive vitamin and mineral pack   
    • Highly bioavailable trace minerals including organic selenium
    • Supports the immune system
    • Vitamin B complex to facilitate metabolic function
    • Improves hoof health
  • Nutrition to support immune and GI tract health
    • Prebiotics, probiotics, enzymes, live yeast and yeast culture
  • Includes all the features & benefits of Equi-lete® Technology

Approximate Macronutrient Analysis

NEMO FeedTypeCrude ProteinStarchSugarFatNDF
Rope 'N' RideTextured12307620
ContenderTextured14257822
Mare 'N' FoalTextured16198922
Performance Pellet 1200Pellet12203535
Performance Pellet 1500Pellet15204531
Balancer 2500Balancer Pellet2576519

Feeding & Management

Guidelines for Horses

Feeding horses is an art that is acquired from experience.

Knowledge of nutrient requirements and an understanding of the composition and use of common feeds serve as the basic information. The individuality of horses and their behavior makes it difficult to feed, maintain the proper body condition, and obtain maximum performance. A certain amount of skill, sound judgment, and experience is required for feeding horses correctly. Horses may be fed as individuals or in groups. The ration should be formulated to meet the nutrient requirements for the appropriate physiological state and should be fed accordingly. Below is an example of feeding the horse based on their physiological state.

Phys. State1Forage %Conc. %2Total %
Mature1.5 — 2.00.0 — 0.51.5 — 2.0
Late gestation1.0 — 1.50.5 — 1.01.5 — 2.0
Lactation1.0 — 2.00.5 — 1.02.0 — 3.0
Working horses
(L, M, I)3
0.8 — 2.00.5 — 2.01.5 — 3.0
Growing
(weanlings)
0.5 — 1.01.5 — 3.02.0 — 3.0
Growing
(yearlines)
1.0 — 1.51.0 — 2.01.8 — 3.0

1 Phys. = Physiological
2 Conc. = Concentrate
3 L = Light work; M = Moderate work; I = Intensive work

 

Basic Equine Feeding Guidelines

Feeding Directions

A horse, by nature, is a grazing species, designed to eat small meals continuously. Forage should be the basis of a horse’s diet and should comprise no less than 1.5% -2% of its body weight per day. Good quality pasture and/or hay provides fiber to fill the large hindgut and to maintain the microbes which convert the fiber to energy, while producing essential vitamins. Fiber also soaks up water, providing a reservoir for later use. Forages contain proteins which can be used to build and sustain muscle. Fresh green forages provide vitamins and omega 3 fatty acids.

While some horses can be maintained on good quality forage alone, others require added concentrates to provide adequate energy, vitamins, and minerals as well as essential amino acids. Performance horses as well as breeding stock will, in most cases, require additional energy, vitamins and minerals in order to perform their best. There are many types of products that can be considered when adding fortification to a horse’s diet, including vitamin and mineral supplements, ration balancers, textured and pelleted feeds, and unfortified grains. An individual horse‘s needs should be considered when adding concentrates to their diet. Questions regarding their stage of life, workload and any specific health issues that require a special diet should be addressed.

There are a few basic rules to follow when adding concentrates to an equine diet:

  • Feed by weight not by volume.
  • Do not feed more then 5lbs of concentrate at one meal. Break larger amounts into smaller portions, feeding several times a day.
  • Feed at approximately the same times each day.Make any changes to feed type or amount gradually, over 5-10 days, allowing the horse’s gut to adjust to the new feed.

Avoid Abrupt Ration Changes

The digestive tract of a horse can be sensitive to dietary changes, and any abrupt changes in your horses’ ration should be avoided. When a horse’s ration is changed due to changes in an exercise program or physiological state, that change in ration should take place gradually over a period of about a week. Sudden changes may cause colic, going off feed, loss of condition, and digestive disturbances. One method for changing a ration is to replace 25 percent of the ration with the new ration every two days so that it takes six days before the horse is eating 100 percent of the new ration. Horses being turned out to pasture should be turned out for 30 minutes the first day and then for increased amounts of time so that after a week, they are left out continuously. This procedure is critical when pastures are lush and green. When horses are returned back to the farm from sales or strenuous performance training, their ration and amount of exercise should be reduced gradually over a two-week period.

One method for changing a ration is to replace 25 percent of the ration with the new ration every two days so that it takes six days before the horse is eating 100 percent of the new ration.

Best Practices for Equine Management

Horses require routine care in order to remain healthy. A quality feeding program and good management practices are paramount to keep your horses in good condition and fit for work and breeding. For a quality feeding program to make a difference in your horse’s health, these basic management practices must be observed.

Access to Fresh, Clean Drinking Water
On average horses drink 10-15 gallons of water each day depending on temperature, humidity, feed, and workload. It is crucial for horses to have a constant source of fresh, clean water. Consider having your water checked for purity.

De-Worm Regularly
Horses are constantly exposed to parasites. Semi-annual fecal analysis can indicate horses with parasite burdens and pinpoint which anthelmintics should be used for treatment. Horses with high worm parasite burdens can appear unthrifty and manifest other serious health complications.

Provide Routine Dental Care
Horses are subject to numerous dental issues which can hinder their ability to consume and digest hay and feed. Their teeth need routine care for optimum health.

Routine Vaccinations
Reduce your horse’s risk of illness due to disease by following your veterinarian’s vaccine recommendations.

Access to Clean, Fresh Air
Good ventilation will help protect horses from respiratory illnesses caused by molds, pathogens, and ammonia build-up in stalls. Cleaning stalls regularly, maximizing turnout, using low-dust bedding and good quality hay will aid in keeping horses healthy.

Provide Forage & Grains that are Free of Dust & Mold
Dust and mold in a horse’s feed can cause respiratory problems. Some molds produce mycotoxins which can cause a host of detrimental health issues when consumed.

Free Access to White Salt
Salt is critical to your horse’s health. The amount of salt needed varies with the horse’s stage of life and workload. Salt will also encourage your horse to drink more water, which is necessary for bodily functions.

Health Focus

Body Condition: Scores of Horses

What is your horse’s body condition? Did you know there was a scoring system to rank your horse’s physical conditioning? What is the appropriate body condition of a horse? These questions have long been misunderstood until Dr. Don Henneke devised a scoring system for the industry. This system can be used across breeds and by all people. This system assigns a score to a particular body condition (1 to 9) as opposed to vague words such as “good,” “fair,” or “bad,” which leaves a wide interpretation.

The horse’s body condition measures the balance between the food he eats and the amount of energy he burns. Body condition can be affected by a wide variety of factors such as: availability offeed, reproductive activities, weather, level of physical activities, health problems, and feeding practices. The actual body condition of a horse can also affect its reproductive capability, performance and work function, along with endocrine and health status. Therefore, it is important to achieve and maintain a proper body condition in your horse.

Gastric Ulcers

Gastric ulcers can affect horses of any age, including foals. Although up to 60% of performance horses and 90% of racehorses have gastric ulcers, non-performance horses can be affected as well. Horses’ stomachs secrete acid 24/7. If they are not continually grazing, the acid can create ulcers in the lining of the stomach. If your horse experiences weight loss and/or loss of appetite, poor body condition and dull coat, poor performance, change in attitude, abdominal sensitivity, or mild recurrent colic, they may have gastric ulcers.

There are both physiological and management risk factors for equine gastric ulcers.

PHYSIOLOGICAL INCLUDE:

  • Horses produce acid 24 hours per day
  • A horse can produce up to 16 gallons of acid a day
  • Stomach acid is buffered by food and saliva
  • Stomach pH can drop significantly when empty. Low pH can cause gastric ulcers

MANAGEMENT FACTORS INCLUDE:

  • Stress: Training, hauling, strenuous exercise, changing pasture mates
  • Stall confinement
  • Periodic feedings, changes in feeding routine, and imposed feed deprivation
  • More than six hours between forage meals
  • Larger grain meals (high starch)
  • Chronic administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

There are some basic management practices that can be observed to help prevent Equine gastric ulcers including:

  • Turnout/grazing
  • Good quality hay, free choice via slow feeder or forage meals fed 4-6 times in 24 hours
  • Slow feed forage from a lower position to maximize saliva production
  • Feed buffering supplement such as Equi-lete® Physique™ or alfalfa hay
  • Minimize quantities of high carbohydrate grain meals
  • Feed forage or buffering supplements prior to exercise
  • Access to clean water

50726 State Hwy 15
Baring, MO 63531
660.892.4537